Diesel Related Questions

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Re: Aneroid Compensator

D
Here's some 1998 Dodge 24v Cummins info, I haven't read it yet.

http://articles.mopar1973man.com/2nd-generation-24v-dodge-cummins

A brief history of Bosch diesel tech.

http://transportation.centennialcollege.ca/oduffy/fuels/HD%20fuels%203/inline.pdf
D
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

D
Differences between VW 1.9 TDI systems, old style has the bolt down engine cover.

http://www.myturbodiesel.com/wiki/vw-and-audi-tdi-fuel-injection-systems-1996-present/

Bosch VE tech:

http://mebonty.monobasin.net/vepump.html

http://www.k-jet.org/files/other/Bosch_VE_Diesel_Injection_Pumps.pdf

Bosch refers to aneroid as an ADA Altitude-Pressure Compensator
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

FiendFX
Too bad they don't have a picture of an aneroid compensator.
D
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

D
I'm working on finding one!

Generally though it should be on top of the fuel pump distributor, the hard part is telling if its a Load/DA or Altitude/DA cause they look almost the same.
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

FiendFX
Ya. For a VW only though.
D
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

D
http://www.injection-pump.com/images/M-TDIPump.jpg

See the crap on the top? Maybe LDA or ADA. I'm almost 100% that there is no vehicle we test that has an aneroid system. This was a capsule that responded to changes in altitude to stop a turbo system form producing smoke on accel. That Bosch doc above was a really great read. Everyone used Bosch Injection Pumps it seems. Except Ford/Navi, computer controlled HEUI.

"Crude attempts were made to control engine emissions on turbocharged versions of these
mechanically controlled inline pump engines, their prime purpose was to reduce visible smoke
emissions. When a turbocharged engine is accelerated there is always a period of “lag” before the
exhausted heat energy can spin up the turbo to increase engine breathing, however on acceleration
the rack would move to full fuel and the available air could not combust the entire fuel load this would
result in a puff of black smoke on acceleration. These systems were variably called a puff limiter or smoke
limiter or an aneroid. These devices functioned to delay
the fuel racks travel to full fuel until there was sufficient air
to combust the large fuel load. They consisted of a simple
device that physically limited the racks travel until boost
pressure acting on a diaphragm could overcome spring
pressure holding the device restricting the racks travel.
Most of these were on off devices if boost was below a
certain level say 5PSI they held the rack at a proportion of
full travel approximately 60 to 80%. Once boost pressure
exceeded the 5PSI the rack would be allowed full travel.
These aneroids were commonly tampered with by drivers
thinking they could get better fuel economy and
performance but remember that any fuel that exits an
engine as black smoke is wasted fuel so the tell tale signs
that an aneroid has been tampered with, that is a puff of
black smoke on acceleration indicates a loss of efficiency
rather than a gain.
A second device was introduced to control rack maximum
travel based on barometric pressure. At higher altitudes
the available air contains less oxygen and therefore
cannot oxidize the same amount of fuel so a barometric
capsule limits rack travel in much the same way as an
aneroid however based only on barometric pressure.
.
.
Hydro mechanical inline pumps could also be
fitted with crude mechanical timing advance
systems that were capable of advancing or
retarding engine timing, (depending on the
engine), by 8 to ten degrees but stricter emission
controls spelled the end for these systems. The only way that manufacturers could meet the ever stricter emission control legislation was to
devise methods to get greater control over fuelling and injection timing throughout the operating
range of the engine this was not
achievable with mechanical
controls.
Inline pump systems were adapted
so that they could be controlled by
computer this makes them partial
authority managed engines. The
amount of control varied by
manufacturer but most inline
pumps were fitted with electronic
timing control and electronic fuel
rack position control these changes
allowed these pumps to be used
well into the 1990s.
One of the most popular adapted
systems was designed by Bosch
using PE-7100 and PE-8500
pumps."

Now that that's settled I want to petition BAR to remove that crap and change Crankcase DR to PCV as well.
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

FiendFX
Yep. I agree. I'll just put n/a for aneroid compensator from now on.
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

smogido
In reply to this post by D
D wrote
http://www.injection-pump.com/images/M-TDIPump.jpg

See the crap on the top? Maybe LDA or ADA. I'm almost 100% that there is no vehicle we test that has an aneroid system. This was a capsule that responded to changes in altitude to stop a turbo system form producing smoke on accel. That Bosch doc above was a really great read. Everyone used Bosch Injection Pumps it seems. Except Ford/Navi, computer controlled HEUI.

"Crude attempts were made to control engine emissions on turbocharged versions of these
mechanically controlled inline pump engines, their prime purpose was to reduce visible smoke
emissions. When a turbocharged engine is accelerated there is always a period of “lag” before the
exhausted heat energy can spin up the turbo to increase engine breathing, however on acceleration
the rack would move to full fuel and the available air could not combust the entire fuel load this would
result in a puff of black smoke on acceleration. These systems were variably called a puff limiter or smoke
limiter or an aneroid. These devices functioned to delay
the fuel racks travel to full fuel until there was sufficient air
to combust the large fuel load. They consisted of a simple
device that physically limited the racks travel until boost
pressure acting on a diaphragm could overcome spring
pressure holding the device restricting the racks travel.
Most of these were on off devices if boost was below a
certain level say 5PSI they held the rack at a proportion of
full travel approximately 60 to 80%. Once boost pressure
exceeded the 5PSI the rack would be allowed full travel.
These aneroids were commonly tampered with by drivers
thinking they could get better fuel economy and
performance but remember that any fuel that exits an
engine as black smoke is wasted fuel so the tell tale signs
that an aneroid has been tampered with, that is a puff of
black smoke on acceleration indicates a loss of efficiency
rather than a gain.
A second device was introduced to control rack maximum
travel based on barometric pressure. At higher altitudes
the available air contains less oxygen and therefore
cannot oxidize the same amount of fuel so a barometric
capsule limits rack travel in much the same way as an
aneroid however based only on barometric pressure.
.
.
Hydro mechanical inline pumps could also be
fitted with crude mechanical timing advance
systems that were capable of advancing or
retarding engine timing, (depending on the
engine), by 8 to ten degrees but stricter emission
controls spelled the end for these systems. The only way that manufacturers could meet the ever stricter emission control legislation was to
devise methods to get greater control over fuelling and injection timing throughout the operating
range of the engine this was not
achievable with mechanical
controls.
Inline pump systems were adapted
so that they could be controlled by
computer this makes them partial
authority managed engines. The
amount of control varied by
manufacturer but most inline
pumps were fitted with electronic
timing control and electronic fuel
rack position control these changes
allowed these pumps to be used
well into the 1990s.
One of the most popular adapted
systems was designed by Bosch
using PE-7100 and PE-8500
pumps."

Now that that's settled I want to petition BAR to remove that crap and change Crankcase DR to PCV as well.
I am confused now....lol  So, The CDR is the same as PCV?? I thought they both are different components..Please correct me on this. Thanks
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

dmlusmc
In reply to this post by D
I think according to the book, dodge trucks were the ones the had CDR pcv systems
D
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

D
I searched ALLDATA for CDR and PCV on almost every application we test, I no longer have ALLDATA but I clearly remember only GM calling anything a CDR, everyone else calls it PCV because it is pretty much the same damn function. More research to follow.
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

Monkey
Found this maybe it can help or not.

http://www.powerstrokediesel.com/docs/EF_456.pdf
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

FiendFX
In reply to this post by smogido
There's no option for PCV, so  I've been putting pass on CDR as PCV. That's the only option. Both are crankcase related.
D
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

D
I'm making a spreadsheet for all the diesels we test, I will put what I think the correct visual components are and include links to back up my conclusions.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AnreQwJLZnBQdFU1VW00YzV5bXhZalp1VFZGZnNiOGc&usp=sharing
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

smogg27
How long does it take to reset the monitors for diesels on ois
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Re: Diesel CAT Types

techton
In reply to this post by barrym95838
84a2jBarry if you still have my personal info contact me.... I have lots of written material on diesel inspection and you can post what you find useful.... or give me your shop address and I will mail it to you there.  Too much to post here.

Techton
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Re: Diesel Related Questions

techton
In reply to this post by FiendFX
  This may be of interest to those on this board:  The Air Resources Board offers an all-day class, #511, Diesel Aftertreatment  Systems.  They are held,  throughout the year, in San Francisco, Reddiing, Sacramento, Diamond Bar (in Southern Calif.) San Diego, and Imperial.  The is no fee for these classes. I checked, and the 2015 schedule is not posted.  Contact Randy Opfer at (916) 322-8049 or e-mail ropfer@arb.ca.gov for a reservation.

  This class covers DPF theory and  logistics, diesel oxidation catalysts, continually regenerating trap devices, and  selective catalyst devices.

  This is very much a theory cless, but it does allow you to be more competent in your inspections.

  There is another class offered by the Calif. Council of Diesel Engine Technology.  This one covers the maintenance of exhaust aftertreatment devices.  This is more of a hand-on class.  There is a fee for this class.

  I have taken the arb class.  Well worth it.

Techton
Ken
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

Ken
In reply to this post by 007
what year model VW had the aneroid compensator?
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

FiendFX
I'm putting N/A on aneroid Compensator on all Diesels.
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

none
1998 Dodge Ram diesel vin D (12V) has an aneroid.  
I've hit rock bottom but I brought a pick and a shovel and I'm ready to dig!
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Re: Aneroid Compensator

FiendFX
Do you have picture? What was the size engine?
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